“Should I Quit Residency?”

If you’re here because you’re asking yourself this question, you’re in the right place! This website was built to help residents find the answer. I asked myself the same question in early 2021 and took about three months to conclude that quitting residency was the right move for me. There weren’t many helpful resources online, so I created this site to provide the guidance that I wish I had. I’m sure you’ll quickly detect the theme here, but I’d like to summarize it for you:

It is okay to consider quitting residency. You are not alone. People have done this before you and will continue to do it after you.

Answering The Question (“should I quit residency?”) can take some time. But it’s 100% doable. If this is your first time here, I recommend starting with my guide below. It will take you through the entire process, starting with your first encounter with The Question, how to answer it, and finally how to quit residency if that’s what you ultimately decide is best for you.


Part One

Ask Away!


Answering The Question (“should I quit residency?”) is a bit of a process. There’s no doubt about it. But I’ve broken it down into small, concrete, achievable steps. The first of which is to simply allow yourself to ask it. Guilt-free. There is nothing inherently wrong with exploring the idea of leaving residency. No one is going to show up at your door and yell at you.

Regardless of what our medical system tells you, you are not a robot. You’re allowed to question your decisions in life, just like everyone else. So, let yourself explore and be kind to yourself along the way. It will inevitably open up a floodgate of other questions:

“will I be throwing all my training away?” “how will I make money?” “what will my friends and family think?” “do I even like medicine?” “how do I quit residency?”

This may seem overwhelming or even impossible to tackle. But it isn’t. Here are two points I think will provide some perspective:

  1. There are answers to all those questions. I’ve gone through it. Many others have as well. You just take it one step at a time. I’ll guide you through that process and share helpful resources.
  2. Think about the alternative. You ignore The Question because it’s too hard to answer. You passively continue down your super-difficult path of medical training, let it dictate the next 40-50 years of your life, and hope for the best.

To be clear, I’m not saying that quitting is right for everyone. I’m sure every single one of us has thought “I hate residency” at some point during our training, so if that was the only prerequisite to dropping out of residency, we’d be in trouble! All I’m saying is, if you’re thinking about quitting residency, let yourself explore a bit. Deciding to continue is just as impactful to your future as deciding to quit.

You may be thinking to yourself “I already decided that medicine was right for me! It was MY decision to apply to medical school!” Well that was like 50 years ago. As Dr. Chelsea Turgeon so eloquently puts it in her book: “We are dynamic beings, meant to grow and evolve and change.” You are not the same person now as you were back then. Just because your past self wanted to pursue medicine, doesn’t necessarily mean your current self would agree. There was no way you could fully understand what medicine was like until you actually did it. And chances are you haven’t had much time to reevaluate your decisions since before medical school.

So, yes, there are plenty of additional questions to consider. It’ll take some time to answer them. But you can get there, just like so many others have. I’ll share resources that I found and some that I created myself, like this awesome flowchart:

Quitting Residency Flowchart
(I dive into this chart more in Part Two)

So, after you feel comfortable asking The Question, you need to create the proper environment to answer it. Next up is Part Two – Setting Yourself Up for Success!

P.S. I am fully aware that referring to it as “The Question” may come off as corny and gimmicky, but I think it helps emphasize its importance, and more importantly, it makes writing about it waaaaaay easier.